Monthly Archives: May 2015

What Causes Severs Disease?

Overview

Pain in the heel of a child’s foot, typically brought on by some form of injury or trauma, is sometimes Sever’s Disease. The disease often mimics Achilles tendonitis, an inflammation of the tendon attached to the back of the heel. A tight Achilles tendon may contribute to Sever’s Disease by pulling excessively on the growth plate of the heel bone. This condition is most common in younger children and is frequently seen in the active soccer, football or baseball player. Sport shoes with cleats are also known to aggravate the condition. Treatment includes calf muscle stretching exercises, heel cushions in the shoes, and/or anti-inflammatory medications. Consult your physician before taking any medications.

Causes

There are many contributing factors that cause strain across the growth plate, making your child prone to developing Sever?s disease. These include repeated minor trauma to the growth plate from running or jumping sports, tight calf or hamstring muscles, rapid growth spurts can lead to the leg muscles becoming tight, increasing tension on the growth plate, tight Achilles tendon, the Achilles tendon attaches to the back of the heel adjacent to the growth plate, poor foot posture, may increase the strain on the growth plate, footwear with a very low heel pitch (eg soccer boots), unsupportive or unstable footwear with poor shock absorption at the heel, running or playing sport on hard surfaces.

Symptoms

Acute pain, pain asscoiatied with Sever?s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running. Highly active – children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever?s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

Diagnosis

A physical exam of the heel will show tenderness over the back of the heel but not in the Achilles tendon or plantar fascia. There may be tightness in the calf muscle, which contributes to tension on the heel. The tendons in the heel get stretched more in patients with flat feet. There is greater impact force on the heels of athletes with a high-arched, rigid foot. The doctor may order an x-ray because x-rays can confirm how mature the growth center is and if there are other sources of heel pain, such as a stress fracture or bone cyst. However, x-rays are not necessary to diagnose Sever?s disease, and it is not possible to make the diagnosis based on the x-ray alone.

Non Surgical Treatment

First, your child should cut down or stop any activity that causes heel pain. Apply ice to the injured heel for 25 minutes three times a day. Your child should not go barefoot. If your child has severe heel pain, ibuprofen (Advil) will help. It is important that your child performs exercises to stretch the hamstring and calf muscles, and the tendons on the back of the leg. The child should do these stretches five times each, two or three times a day. Each stretch should be held for 20 seconds. Your child also needs to do exercises to strengthen the muscles on the front of the shin. To do this, have your child stand facing a wall to stretch the calves and the heel cord. Place one foot a shoulder?s width in front of the other, both feet facing the wall. The front knee is bent and the back knee is straight during the calf stretch. Then have your child push against the wall and feel the stretch in his or her back leg. To stretch out the heel cord, have him or her stay in the same position and bend the back knee. Repeat three times. Practice this stretch twice daily.

Prevention

Properly stretching to maintain flexibility is effective for preventing Sever’s disease. Stretches should target the calves, heel cords, and hamstrings. Your child should do the appropriate stretches two or three times a day, holding the stretch for about 20 seconds each time. Ask your child’s doctor for specific exercise instructions. Generally, doctors advise stretching both legs, even if the pain is confined to one heel. It’s also helpful to strengthen the shin muscles by having your youngster pull his toes in with a rubber exercise band or a piece of tubing and then stretch them forward. Assist your child in doing 15 repetitions of this exercise, three times a day. Having your child wear shoes with good shock absorbers and avoid running on hard surfaces as much as possible should also help prevent the condition.